Kilimanjaro - Extension

Overview  •  Detailed Itinerary  •  FAQ's  •  Testimonials
 

Day 1: Arrival Moshi

Arrive at the Kilimanjaro or Dar es Salaam International Airport. You will be met at the airport and transferred to the hotel in Moshi for your overnight. You can start your trek any day of the year! Overnight in Moshi.

 

Day 2: Marangu, to Mandara Hut

After breakfast and a briefing from your guide, leave Moshi at 9 AM, drive for 45 minutes to the Marangu Gate on the eastern side of Kilimanjaro, register with the national park, and begin hiking at 10:30 AM. In the rainforest, look for towering Eucalyptus trees, bird life, and Colubus monkeys. At these lower elevations, it can be wet and muddy, so gaiters and trekking poles will help. Shorts and t-shirts should be sufficient, but keep your rain gear and warmer clothing handy. Stop halfway for lunch, and reach the Mandara Huts at 2 or 3 PM. Unpack, rest, and have some tea or coffee. A 15 minute side trip to Maundy Crater is a good way to see the surroundings including Northern Tanzania and Kenya. Dinner is served during the early evening at 7 PM. Bathrooms with running water are available. Overnight Mandara Hut.

Moshi (915 m/3,000 ft) to Marangu Gate (1,830 m/6,000 ft) to Mandara Hut (2,740m/9,000 ft)
12 km, 4-5 hours

 

Day 3: Mandara, to Horombo Hut

Wake to a 7:30 AM breakfast, and pack for your next trek. Break camp by 8:30 AM, hike for an hour through rainforest glades, then follow an ascending path through heath land where you can look for giant lobelias and groundsels. Continue up into open moorlands where small shrubs are the main vegetation. Stop halfway for lunch, where you can enjoy amazing views of Mawenzi. Arrive at the Horombo Huts by 3 PM, where you can see Kibo's summit. Rest, unpack, and prepare for dinner. Bathrooms with running water are available.

You may start to feel the effects of altitude here, and to aid your acclimatization, you can choose to spend an extra day resting at Horombo or climbing to a base camp below Kibo's sub peak Mawenzi. Overnight in Horombo Hut.

Mandara Huts (2,740 m/9,000 ft) to Horombo Huts (3,690 m/12,100 ft)
11 km, 6-8 hours

 

Day 4: Kibo Hut

Wake to breakfast as usual, but if you wake early you can get some great photos of the sunrise. The first part of the day's hike climbs through the dwindling heath land that blends into a moonscape as you enter the sweeping saddle connecting Mawenzi and Kibo. When you stop for lunch, and later when you cross this surprisingly large saddle, you can examine the summit climb up Kibo that you will be starting in just a few hours. Be careful to notice any signs of altitude sickness. There is no running water at the Kibo Huts. Overnight in Kibo Huts.

Horombo Huts (3,690 m/12,100 ft) to Kibo Huts (4,695 m/15,400 ft)
10 km, 6-8 hours

 

Day 5: Summit Day!

Wake at midnight to a light breakfast, and then prepare for your summit ascent. The goal is to climb before dawn so that you can reach Uhuru Peak shortly after sunrise. Leave at 1 AM, switchback up steep scree or possibly snow, and reach Gilman's Point on the crater rim at 5,861 m/18,640 ft between 5 and 7 AM. Here, views of the fabled crater and its icecaps greet you. Another 2 hours of hiking along the crater rim near the celebrated snows takes you to Kilimanjaro true summit, Uhuru Peak, by 9 AM. This is Africa's highest point, and you would have to travel more than 3,000 miles toward the Himalayas to find a higher peak! Be sure to have your picture taken at the summit to show your friends. After your summit stay, descend back to the Kibo Huts, have lunch, rest, collect your things, and re cross the saddle to the Horombo Huts. Eat dinner and get some well-deserved sleep!

You do the beginning of this climb in the dark with headlamps or flashlights. It will be very cold until you start descending, so you will need all of your warm layers. This is, by far, the most difficult part of the trek. Slowly slowly, or, "pole pole," and an optimistic attitude will get you there! Overnight Horombo Huts.

Kibo Huts (4,695 m/15,400 ft) to Uhuru Peak (5,895 m/19,340 ft) to Horombo Huts (3,690 m/12,100 ft)
4 km up, 14 km down
10-15 hours

 

Day 6: Horombo Huts to marangu gate to Moshi

Wake as usual, pack, and descend through the moorland to the Mandara Huts. Have lunch there then continue your triumphant recessional down through lush forest to the park gate, which you should reach around 2 or 3 PM. Remember to tip your guides, cooks, and porters, since you will be leaving them here. A vehicle will take you back to the hotel in Moshi, where it is definitely time for celebration! Overnight in Moshi.

Horombo Huts (3,690 m/12,100 ft) to Marangu Gate (1,830 m/6,000 ft) to Moshi (890 m/2,920 ft)
18 km, 5-7 hours

 

Day 7: Moshi

Depart for the airport or other destinations in Tanzania or Kenya. A trip to the beaches at Zanzibar is a good way to recuperate.

Mt. Kilimanjaro

Mt. Kilimanjaro is a vision that has fed the human imagination for years. Much more than the highest mountain in Africa, it is innately and inexhaustibly symbolic.

Writers render it, climbers conquer it, Africans worship it, and at the end of the day its magnetic singularity remains undiminished. Though speechless wonder reigns in its presence, the traveller who witnesses Kilimanjaro Mountain will speak of it for years.

Rising 19,340 ft (5,895 m) above the African plain, Kilimanjaro truly stands alone among the mountains of the world. The huge, solitary volcano is unaccompanied by any mountain chain. Though its size is immense, it also has one of the world's most accessible peaks. he lower slopes of the mountain are defined by coffee and banana fields that rise up and end where the mountain's forest begins.

An average of 80 inches of rainfall a year make the forest home to some botanical treats. Tree ferns in this region are known to grow up to 20 feet, and giant lobelia often reach 30 feet. At an altitude of about 9,000 feet, the forest gives way to grasslands and shrubbery, and elephant can sometimes be spotted roaming the high slopes. At about 13,000 feet life begins to recede, a result of extreme weather conditions inhospitable to anything more than small mosses and lichens. Once the summit area is reached, three glaciers and three volcanic peaks sit in lofty, placid contemplation of the tremendous plains over 3.5 miles below.

© Tanzania High Commission, London

 
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